Bonded by b-school applications. We are two young professional women who became friends while applying to business school. Throughout the process, we commiserated about the challenges of being ambitious, go-getting 20-something females in today's corporate environment. Between our full-time jobs, running a side hustle, planning a wedding, maintaining relationships with friends and family, and health & fitness, we were consumed with exhaustion, uncertainty and anxiety. We relied on honest conversations with each other to pull through.

The gap. For all the online content and resources out there for ambitious, career-driven women (MBA's or not), we feel that most of it lacks true substance. The glamourous success stories and "How I Did It!" content we were reading was unrelatable and seemed to gloss over the uncomfortable truths of being young women in business.

There just isn’t enough content that addresses the tradeoffs, sacrifices and decision points that women uniquely face. The most helpful advice we ended up getting was IRL — from other women who had already been through it all and were willing to share what was beneath the surface.

 Our offering. femBA is a platform for honest stories and conversations about being a young professional woman in business school, in the workplace, and beyond. We pull back the curtain on the unique experiences and challenges of today's ambitious women as they navigate school, their careers, and their lives.

The Case For This Project

Wait...aren't we living in a post-feminist world?  Aren't rates of women enrolling in top MBA programs going up every year? Isn't the wage gap shrinking? Why are you still talking about this?!

Among many, many reasons, here are a few:

  1. Single women MBAs are downplaying their ambition to help themselves in the marriage market.

  2. The proportion of female MBA applicants worldwide has been stuck at an average of 38 per cent since 2012 (GMAC).

  3. Change is happening too slowly. We may not hit 50-50 within the next 10 years. 10 YEARS?!

  4. The gender wage gap is alive and well for MBAs.  There is a $14K pay gap right out of the gate for women MBA grads and the gap over the 20 years after graduating can reach $400k.

  5. Women are aiming too low right from the application process.